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Finn Ames and the Friend is the fifty-second chapter of the Mashle series and the ninth chapter of the Divine Visionary Selection Exam Arc.

Summary

Finn begs for someone to save him as Carpaccio recognizes him, saying his name. Finn wonders why he would know who he is, and Carpaccio says that Finn is the 'continuing student who barely made the cutoff.' He says that he always wondered why Finn was even at Easton, and asks if his brother got him into the Divine Visionary Selection Exam. He says that he feels disgusted when he sees 'talent-less trash like [Finn].' He tells Finn to give him his crystal, as it's not right that he his here in the first place. Finn says that Carpaccio is scary, probably the scariest person he has ever met, but he has to protect the crystal until the end, as Mash's future depends on it. Suddenly, blood starts to spurt out of Finn's chest, causing him to fall to his knees. Carpaccio pulls out a knife and asks what 'someone so weak was doing acting like a big shot.' Carpaccio says that Finn must know the difference in their stength, so he might as well hand over the crystal without getting hurt, reminding him what he did to Pon Torus. He says that he won't ask again and tells Finn to give him the crystal.

Margarette Macaron is shown to be walking around, presumably looking for someone to fight, as she is thinking to herself that there are three stand-out students that are participating in the Exam. Mash Burnedead, who can't use magic, Lance Crown, who took first place among the entering students and Carpaccio Luo-Yang, who maintained first place among the continuing students. She says that she imagined that Carpaccio was like her, in that he didn't care about becoming a Divine Visionary, and that her guess would be that Orter Mádl has cut him some sort of a deal. She says that Carpaccio is a prodigy that was chosen by a wand fit to be a national treasure and that in terms of talent, he is the best at Easton.

Carpaccio says that he doesn't understand what Finn is trying to achieve, as he will get the crystal anyway. Finn thinks to himself that he only needs to protect the crystal, and that as Carpaccio is underestimating him, this is his chance. He calls out the spell 'Dangerousse', causing Carpaccio to look up, but nothing happens. Finn begins to run, as Carpaccio, believing it was just a trick to help him escape, begins to follow him. However, as soon as he takes a step, Finn calls out 'Changeas', sending Carpaccio back to where he encountered Pon Torus, who has since disappeared. Finn continues to run away, trying to maintained the distance between the two, but his legs suddenly start to bleed, causing him to fall to the ground in pain. Carpaccio catches up to him, telling him to give him the crystal. However, when Finn doesn't, Carpaccio says 'Weaklings need to step down' and stabs himself in the stomach, three times, causing Finn to take damage. Finn says that he will never give over the crystal, thinking back about the time that he has spent with Mash. He says that he is a loser and a coward, but he would never abandon a friend. He attempts to cast 'Nalcos', but again, he spurts out blood. Carpaccio tells Finn to stop, as 'people who'll never succeed and still try their hardest bother me more than anything.' He raises the knife up and puts it up against his neck, saying that he will show Finn that his efforts have been wasted, but before he can do anything, Mash appears and slams Carpaccio into a wall. He says that Finn's efforts weren't wasted as he is there now, thanking Finn.

Chapter Notes

  • This is the first chapter title to feature Finn Ames.
  • Finn's magic is shown for the first time.

Characters in Order of Appearance

References

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Chapters by Arc
Easton Enrollment
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Forest
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Magia Lupus
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Execution
40414243
Divine Visionary Selection Exam
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Tri-Magic-Athalon Divine Visonary Final Exam
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